Posts tagged sos kinderdorf
It’s a wrap! December 2017
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When I thought about what I’d like to achieve in 2017, I had two things on my mind: I wanted to share my learnings at Creative Mornings and I wanted to teach. Now that December is over, I’ve come to realize I’ve reached both of these goals. Through a weird series of coincidences, I was asked to speak at Creative Mornings Vienna last February. (My plan was to launch my Kickstarter campaign at the end of the talk, which, given there was a technical bug, wasn’t meant to work out. How apt given the title of the talk which was "Plan B is always better.")

My second goal – to teach – came about unexpectedly as well. My original plan was to discontinue my freelance practice to join the Teach4Austria initiative. Given I went to a secondary school with a high quota of immigrants, I’ve had the desire to give back for a long time. Unfortunately, I didn’t make it through the assessment center. However, my goal to teach happened in a different way. After giving a lecture at the New Design University in November, the students seemed to have enjoyed it so much that I was asked to come back and teach a whole seminar. I lead a seminar on how to use social media to position yourself as a designer online. That brings me to the article I wrote that was published on the Kontist blog where I explain how designers can monetize their talents. 

This past month, I’ve joined the Berlin-based strategic consultancy Beluga to participate in an innovation workshop for a global beauty brand. I might also work with them on a project in the vegan foods industry, which would be incredibly exciting. 

One of the things that happened this past month that I’m most excited about is that SOS Kinderdorf finally tried a different approach to fundraising. During the Edelstoff market, we teamed up with letterers to create beautiful Christmas cards in exchange for donations. On one hand, we had boxes there for people to donate immediately, and on another hand, people were invited to use We’R’SOS to raise money online. I’ve been working with SOS Kinderdorf on different approaches to fundraising for some time, so I'm glad we’re slowly moving forward. 

A small side project also went live a few weeks ago: I made a new website for my yoga teacher. Feel free to book a retreat or come to one of her classes in Vienna. She’s amazing! 

Last but not least, I’m currently learning SQL. If you have any tips, feel free to share! Also, if you need someone to help you with positioning, retention, and/or marketing, don’t hesitate to drop me a line! (helloATmkanokovaDOTcom) 

It’s a wrap! June

I kicked off June with a second workshop with the team at SOS Kinderdorf. We’ve discussed community building for their various activities. As transparency must be at the core for any business that wants to build a community, it was rather challenging to figure out a strategy for community building initiatives while making sure the privacy of SOS Kinderdorf's protégés remains guaranteed. 

Nowadays, and with the rise of the social web, many people want to have a full understanding of how different systems work and they want to understand in more detail what happens to their money. While the social web has given everyone the tools to emotionalize people and build a community, people are being held accountable and must remain open and transparent if they want to win trust of donors.

In my opinion, having to be transparent has paved the way for independent makers and creators, and it’s what makes working with Kickstarter creators so enjoyable. In June, I organized an event for fashion creators. I also helped Matriarch, I Lock It, and Triggers to hit their goals on Kickstarter.

Furthermore, I was honored to participate in Stephan’s Kardos Creativity Gym as a speaker to a small group of talented students at the University of Economics in Vienna. 

One of my favorite community building initiatives was Joe Edelman’s Soundtrack Dinner. Joe created a playlist and invited everyone to come up with a tapas dish to go with the song he chose. For one hour, we listened to the songs, while eating. Talking wasn’t allowed. The sensory feeling one gets from focusing all your energy on your ears and taste buds was pretty much unforgettable, and I’d recommend everyone to try this out at home too! It was, let me tell you, bloody damn amazing!

Let’s see what July brings!

It’s a wrap! April

One day, just like that, I received an email from the SOS Kinderdorf Austria asking whether I’d like to talk to them about community building. As I said when I summarized my February, you can only do what you can fit into your week, so focusing all my time and energy working with Kickstarter these days, I would have passed this challenge to someone else. However, given the type of work SOS Kinderdorf does, I thought they might benefit from my observations on why certain Kickstarter creators succeed and others don’t when trying to make their projects come to life, as well as how I’ve seen online communities evolve in the past couple of years. I will write a more in-depth report once we have some success stories to show. 


The 1st of April marked one year of me representing Kickstarter in DE, AT, and NL. I’m incredibly proud of having worked with the team for so long. I would have never expected for this to become such a long-term collaboration, but once your values and the values of a company align so well, it wouldn’t make much sense to do anything else. 


In the past, I’ve often switched between jobs when I saw my goals there as accomplished or thought my work could benefit another company more, but with Kickstarter, there has been a continuous supply of new challenges. 


On one hand, not as many people in Europe know what Kickstarter is, and the far bigger challenge is the preoccupations I often face when talking about Kickstarter with people I meet: to many, Kickstarter is a platform where you ask for money and people, an anonymous crowd, throws it at you. From my perspective on the other hand, Kickstarter works because successful creators are genuine with their output and want to share their creative work with others. Creativity in a professional sense is often only possible when there is the necessary funding and so, yes, Kickstarter is a tool to help raise money. But overall, it’s more about giving and not so much about getting. If anything, it’s a platform that connects people so that both parties benefit: the supporter gets a piece of the creation the creative produced. 


What I consider my biggest challenge at this point is to clearly communicate the values the team in Greenpoint and I share, and how these observations can be translated into successful campaigning. To me personally, Kickstarter is far more about social mobility than it is about making the big buck. I’ve touched upon this subject in an interview with The Apartment that will be released in May.


If you need help with your Kickstarter project or would like me to come to talk to your community at a local coworking space or a creative university, please let me know.